Friday, June 6, 2014

Interfaith educator talks to local Muslim youth about identity

ToledoFAVS

Interfaith educator talks to local Muslim youth about identity
 

Hind Makki, an interfaith educator from Chicago, presented a workshop on identity to young Muslims at the Toledo Muslim Community Center (TMCC). The workshop was hosted by TMCC’s youth group, Y-MIND, which stands for Young Muslim Initiative for Networking and Development.
Hind Makki speaks at the Toledo Muslim Community Center. Photo courtesy of TMCC
Hind Makki speaks at the Toledo Muslim Community Center. Photo courtesy of TMCC
The Nov. 8 workshop was titled “Hyphen-nation: What it Means to be an American Muslim Young Adult.”
“We talked a lot about the identity that America has been challenged with, in challenges with race and racism,” Makki said.
http://toledofavs.com/2013/12/01/interfaith-educator-talks-local-muslim-youth-identity/

See more at: http://toledofavs.com/2013/12/01/interfaith-educator-talks-local-muslim-youth-identity/#sthash.5mTNa7MJ.dpuf

New pizzeria caters to local Muslim community





New pizzeria caters to local Muslim communityhttp://toledofavs.com/2013/10/30/new-pizzeria-caters-local-muslim-community/

 

A new pizzeria, ZaZa Wood-Fired Pizza, offers homemade, halal, and authentic Italian pizza that caters to the local Muslim community
Saif Dari, the owner, opened ZaZa on June 15.
Saif Dari, owner of ZaZa Wood Fired Pizza in West Toledo, makes halal pizzas using meat made according to Islamic guidelines.
Saif Dari, owner of ZaZa Wood-Fired Pizza in West Toledo, makes halal pizzas using meat made according to Islamic guidelines. Photo courtesy of Saif Dari
Dari came to the United States in 2000 after living in Italy and owning his own pizzeria there. After working at a pizza franchise in Toledo, he decided to open his own restaurant to make the ingredients from scratch.
“Everything came ready [at the franchise] and they didn’t do anything creative. It was all packaged and everything was ready. I thought maybe I can do a better job and do something similar to what I had in Italy. So I am cooking everything from scratch and do the dough,” Dari said.
- See more at: http://toledofavs.com/2013/10/30/new-pizzeria-caters-local-muslim-community/#sthash.fKDqkKcr.dpuf

Toledo native in Beirut urges dialogue between U.S., Mideast youth




http://toledofavs.com/2014/04/16/toledo-native-beirut-encourages-dialogue-u-s-mideast-youth/

Toledo native in Beirut urges dialogue between U.S., Mideast youth

 

Jessica Anderson believes that young Americans can learn a lot through dialogue with people from some of the world’s hotspots.
Jessica Anderson, 24, a Toledo native, is living in Beirut and working promote international dialogue among young people. Photo courtesy of Jessica Anderson
Jessica Anderson, 24, a Toledo native living in Beirut, is working to promote international dialogue among young people. Photo courtesy of Jessica Anderson
“If you glance at mainstream media headlines today, you will draw a very pessimistic picture of the Middle East, North Africa, and South Asia,” Anderson said. “There are reasons for this, because there are very real challenges facing countries in these regions. But among Americans, there is a general lack of knowledge about the history of these countries. Given that we have been deeply involved in this history, it becomes problematic for Americans’ views to be shaped by sensational, headline-making snapshots.”
Anderson, 24, is a  2008 graduate of Anthony Wayne High School who earned a bachelor’s degree in international studies from the University of Kentucky and a master’s degree from Oxford University in refugee studies and forced migration.

- See more at: http://toledofavs.com/2014/04/16/toledo-native-beirut-encourages-dialogue-u-s-mideast-youth/#sthash.b0LC7EZb.dpuf

Arab-American arts exhibit aims to bring people together

ToledoFAVS



Arab-American arts exhibit aims to bring people together

 

http://toledofavs.com/2014/06/04/arab-american-arts-exhibit-aims-to-bring-people-together/
The Network Arab-American Professionals, Toledo Chapter, (NAAP-Toledo) is hosting its first arts exhibition titled We’ve Got Talent.
Nadeem Salem helped organize the exhibit We've Got Talent.
Nadeem Salem formed Network Arab-American Professionals, Toledo Chapter, in 2013.
Nada Salem, coordinator of the event, said she hopes it will encourage people of all backgrounds to be more active in the community.
“The main thing that we’re trying to highlight is the positivity that we have as Arabs,” she said. “We want to show our community — the whole community of Toledo — that we have talent and we have a lot of things we would like to share with them.”
NAAP-Toledo was formed in March 2013 by Nadeem Salem.

- See more at: http://toledofavs.com/2014/06/04/arab-american-arts-exhibit-aims-to-bring-people-together/#sthash.cn4fWmIT.dpuf

Embracing your Arab parents' accent


EMBRACING YOUR ARAB PARENTS’ ACCENT
As part of our April  #MENAHeritage Programming, MuslimARC is highlighting voices of Arab, North African, and Middle Eastern people. In diaspora, language, whether Arabic, Nubian, Amizigh, and even local dialects (‘amiyyah or darijah), figures heavily in maintaining cultural identity and a sense of belonging.  One of one of our favorite netizens, @ayakhalil, shared her thoughts below:
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Embracing your Arab parents’ accent 
Arabic language. Complex. Poetic. Graceful. Unique. Ancient. Charming. Those are the adjectives that come into my mind when I think of the Arabic language.
 It took me quite some time to appreciate my parents’ native language while growing up. When I was younger, I would often feel embarrassed when my parents spoke to me in Arabic in public – especially in front of my American, non-Arabic speaking friends. I would quickly whisper back to my mom or dad and then proudly switch back to English with my friends. After all, I had to prove to my friends that I was a proficient English-speaking American.
At restaurants, my mom would order food for me and my siblings with her apparent, yet coherent accent in English. Waiters would  often condescendingly ask her to repeat her order. One of us would step in and complete the order. Sometimes we would then all joke and laugh about it as we told her the proper pronunciation. Although we all knew what she said was understandable and the waiter was being a bigoted jerk.
As I got older, I began to realize how precious the Arabic language was and how my parents made a  significant effort to preserve our native language and to be bilingual in Arabic and English.  Laughing at an older amo’s thick accent in English became nothing short of immature. Hearing a person who recently moved to the U.S. from the Middle East say phrases like  “Please, I’d like a pepsi and pizza,” and not differentiating between the P and B is not a laughing matter. That is not called “poor” English. These “accents” are simply a variety of the English language. These are struggles immigrants face: language, identity, raising children and culture shock. Laughing the different way they pronounce certain letters and words English is simply being arrogant and insensitive. We laugh at how the older generation from the Middle East speak English, yet most of us would struggle to read and understand an excerpt from an Arabic newspaper.
I’ve come to cherish my parents’ accents.  I strongly believe holding on to one’s native language is crucial in today’s society.  I encourage immigrants or visitors from overseas to embrace their varieties of English  and be confident
when speaking in English. Often times while speaking in Arabic, I sprinkle a few English words here and there. But lately I’ve been trying to figure out what those English words are in Arabic so I can properly introduce those Arabic vocabulary words to my daughter. Arabs can contribute so much to society by being bilingual and build bridges within the communities.
Embrace your unique native language, your parents’ beautiful linguistic diversity , and your cultural background because those make you stand out in today’s world.
Aya Khalil is a freelance journalist and educator. She can be contacted atwww.ayakhalil.blogpost.com
We will discuss language and much more during our live panel  at 6 pm EST/ 3 pm EST.  You can send in questions to our panelists by posting/commening here on MuslimARC’s Tumblr, on MuslimARC’s Facebook, or by tweeting out using #AskMARC or #MENARising. To RSVP or for more details on the discussion, check out our event page. 

Wednesday, September 18, 2013

Family, including Toledo brother, mourns shooting death of doctor in Egypt sit-in


An Egyptian doctor who was shot and killed by security forces while volunteering at a field hospital during the Aug. 14 massacre in Cairo was remembered as a quiet hero by friends and relatives, including a brother in Toledo.
Maged Ahmed Yousef, a cardiologist from Helwan, Egypt, was shot four times on Aug. 14 when Egyptian security forces raided a massive sit-in in Cairo.
Dr. Maged Ahmed Yousef, who was shot and killed while volunteering to help at an Egyptian protest, has a brother in Toledo.
Dr. Maged Ahmed Yousef, who was shot and killed while volunteering to help at an Egyptian protest, has a brother in Toledo.
Yousef, who would have turned 48 on Monday (Aug. 26), had volunteered at different field hospitals since the January 2011 revolution, according to his brother, Khaled Ahmed ElSayed, a cardiovascular first assistant from Toledo, Ohio.
- See more at: http://toledofavs.com/2013/08/22/family-mourns-shooting-death-of-doctor-in-egypt-sit-in/#sthash.OE01W1YB.dpuf

Local Muslims celebrate Eid al-Fitr, marking the end of Ramadan



Toledo-area Muslims celebrated Eid al-Fitr with prayer service, family, friends, food and activities on Thursday (Aug. 8).
Muslims listen to a sermon by Imam Ahmed Abou Seif at an Eid al-Fitr celebration at Toledo's Sultan Club.
Muslims listen to a sermon by Imam Ahmed Abou Seif at an Eid al-Fitr celebration at Toledo’s Sultan Club.
About 550 Muslims gathered at Sultan Club to celebrate Eid al-Fitr, marking the end of Ramadan, said Ahmed Hassabelnaby, Eid committee chair at the Toledo Muslim Community Center.
- See more at: http://toledofavs.com/2013/08/14/local-muslims-celebrate-eid-al-fitr-marking-the-end-of-ramadan/#sthash.ch5isuep.dpuf